Verse of the Day 6-17-13 Psalm 69:4-5


Verse of the Day

Sing to God, sing praises to his name; lift up a song to him who rides through the deserts; his name is the Lord; exult before him! Father of the fatherless and protector of widows is God in his holy habitation. Psalm 68:4-5 ESV

Psalm 68

English Standard Version (ESV)

God Shall Scatter His Enemies

To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. A Song.

68 God shall arise, his enemies shall be scattered;
and those who hate him shall flee before him!
2 As smoke is driven away, so you shall drive them away;
as wax melts before fire,
so the wicked shall perish before God!
3 But the righteous shall be glad;
they shall exult before God;
they shall be jubilant with joy!

4 Sing to God, sing praises to his name;
lift up a song to him who rides through the deserts;
his name is the Lord;
exult before him!
5 Father of the fatherless and protector of widows
is God in his holy habitation.
6 God settles the solitary in a home;
he leads out the prisoners to prosperity,
but the rebellious dwell in a parched land.

7 O God, when you went out before your people,
when you marched through the wilderness, Selah
8 the earth quaked, the heavens poured down rain,
before God, the One of Sinai,
before God, the God of Israel.
9 Rain in abundance, O God, you shed abroad;
you restored your inheritance as it languished;
10 your flock[a] found a dwelling in it;
in your goodness, O God, you provided for the needy.

11 The Lord gives the word;
the women who announce the news are a great host:
12     “The kings of the armies—they flee, they flee!”
The women at home divide the spoil—
13     though you men lie among the sheepfolds—
the wings of a dove covered with silver,
its pinions with shimmering gold.
14 When the Almighty scatters kings there,
let snow fall on Zalmon.

15 O mountain of God, mountain of Bashan;
O many-peaked[b] mountain, mountain of Bashan!
16 Why do you look with hatred, O many-peaked mountain,
at the mount that God desired for his abode,
yes, where the Lord will dwell forever?
17 The chariots of God are twice ten thousand,
thousands upon thousands;
the Lord is among them; Sinai is now in the sanctuary.
18 You ascended on high,
leading a host of captives in your train
and receiving gifts among men,
even among the rebellious, that the Lord God may dwell there.

19 Blessed be the Lord,
who daily bears us up;
God is our salvation. Selah
20 Our God is a God of salvation,
and to God, the Lord, belong deliverances from death.
21 But God will strike the heads of his enemies,
the hairy crown of him who walks in his guilty ways.
22 The Lord said,
“I will bring them back from Bashan,
I will bring them back from the depths of the sea,
23 that you may strike your feet in their blood,
that the tongues of your dogs may have their portion from the foe.”

24 Your procession is[c] seen, O God,
the procession of my God, my King, into the sanctuary—
25 the singers in front, the musicians last,
between them virgins playing tambourines:
26 “Bless God in the great congregation,
the Lord, O you[d] who are of Israel‘s fountain!”
27 There is Benjamin, the least of them, in the lead,
the princes of Judah in their throng,
the princes of Zebulun, the princes of Naphtali.

28 Summon your power, O God,[e]
the power, O God, by which you have worked for us.
29 Because of your temple at Jerusalem
kings shall bear gifts to you.
30 Rebuke the beasts that dwell among the reeds,
the herd of bulls with the calves of the peoples.
Trample underfoot those who lust after tribute;
scatter the peoples who delight in war.[f]
31 Nobles shall come from Egypt;
Cush shall hasten to stretch out her hands to God.

32 O kingdoms of the earth, sing to God;
sing praises to the Lord, Selah
33 to him who rides in the heavens, the ancient heavens;
behold, he sends out his voice, his mighty voice.
34 Ascribe power to God,
whose majesty is over Israel,
and whose power is in the skies.
35 Awesome is God from his[g] sanctuary;
the God of Israel—he is the one who gives power and strength to his people.
Blessed be God!

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 68:10 Or your congregation
  2. Psalm 68:15 Or hunch-backed; also verse 16
  3. Psalm 68:24 Or has been
  4. Psalm 68:26 The Hebrew for you is plural here
  5. Psalm 68:28 By revocalization (compare Septuagint); Hebrew Your God has summoned your power
  6. Psalm 68:30 The meaning of the Hebrew verse is uncertain
  7. Psalm 68:35 Septuagint; Hebrew your

Verse of the Day 5-21-13 Jeremiah 22:28-30


Verse of the Day

28 Is this man Coniah a despised, broken pot, a vessel no one cares for? Why are he and his children hurled and cast into a land that they do not know? 29 O land, land, land, hear the word of the Lord! 30 Thus says the Lord: “Write this man down as childless, a man who shall not succeed in his days, for none of his offspring shall succeed in sitting on the throne of David and ruling again in Judah.” Jeremiah 22:28-30 ESV

Jeremiah 22

English Standard Version (ESV)

22 Thus says the Lord: “Go down to the house of the king of Judah and speak there this word, and say, ‘Hear the word of the Lord, O king of Judah, who sits on the throne of David, you, and your servants, and your people who enter these gates. Thus says the Lord: Do justice and righteousness, and deliver from the hand of the oppressor him who has been robbed. And do no wrong or violence to the resident alien, the fatherless, and the widow, nor shed innocent blood in this place. For if you will indeed obey this word, then there shall enter the gates of this house kings who sit on the throne of David, riding in chariots and on horses, they and their servants and their people. But if you will not obey these words, I swear by myself, declares the Lord, that this house shall become a desolation. For thus says the Lord concerning the house of the king of Judah:

“‘You are like Gilead to me,
like the summit of Lebanon,
yet surely I will make you a desert,
an uninhabited city.[a]
I will prepare destroyers against you,
each with his weapons,
and they shall cut down your choicest cedars
and cast them into the fire.

“‘And many nations will pass by this city, and every man will say to his neighbor, “Why has the Lord dealt thus with this great city?” And they will answer, “Because they have forsaken the covenant of the Lord their God and worshiped other gods and served them.”’”

10 Weep not for him who is dead,
nor grieve for him,
but weep bitterly for him who goes away,
for he shall return no more
to see his native land.

Message to the Sons of Josiah

11 For thus says the Lord concerning Shallum the son of Josiah, king of Judah, who reigned instead of Josiah his father, and who went away from this place: “He shall return here no more, 12 but in the place where they have carried him captive, there shall he die, and he shall never see this land again.”

13 “Woe to him who builds his house by unrighteousness,
and his upper rooms by injustice,
who makes his neighbor serve him for nothing
and does not give him his wages,
14 who says, ‘I will build myself a great house
with spacious upper rooms,’
who cuts out windows for it,
paneling it with cedar
and painting it with vermilion.
15 Do you think you are a king
because you compete in cedar?
Did not your father eat and drink
and do justice and righteousness?
Then it was well with him.
16 He judged the cause of the poor and needy;
then it was well.
Is not this to know me?
declares the Lord.
17 But you have eyes and heart
only for your dishonest gain,
for shedding innocent blood,
and for practicing oppression and violence.”

18 Therefore thus says the Lord concerning Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah:

“They shall not lament for him, saying,
‘Ah, my brother!’ or ‘Ah, sister!’
They shall not lament for him, saying,
‘Ah, lord!’ or ‘Ah, his majesty!’
19 With the burial of a donkey he shall be buried,
dragged and dumped beyond the gates of Jerusalem.”

20 “Go up to Lebanon, and cry out,
and lift up your voice in Bashan;
cry out from Abarim,
for all your lovers are destroyed.
21 I spoke to you in your prosperity,
but you said, ‘I will not listen.’
This has been your way from your youth,
that you have not obeyed my voice.
22 The wind shall shepherd all your shepherds,
and your lovers shall go into captivity;
then you will be ashamed and confounded
because of all your evil.
23 O inhabitant of Lebanon,
nested among the cedars,
how you will be pitied when pangs come upon you,
pain as of a woman in labor!”

24 “As I live, declares the Lord, though Coniah the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, were the signet ring on my right hand, yet I would tear you off 25 and give you into the hand of those who seek your life, into the hand of those of whom you are afraid, even into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and into the hand of the Chaldeans. 26 I will hurl you and the mother who bore you into another country, where you were not born, and there you shall die. 27 But to the land to which they will long to return, there they shall not return.”

28 Is this man Coniah a despised, broken pot,
a vessel no one cares for?
Why are he and his children hurled and cast
into a land that they do not know?
29 O land, land, land,
hear the word of the Lord!
30 Thus says the Lord:
“Write this man down as childless,
a man who shall not succeed in his days,
for none of his offspring shall succeed
in sitting on the throne of David
and ruling again in Judah.”

Footnotes:

  1. Jeremiah 22:6 Hebrew cities

Verse of the Day 4-1-13 Psalm 14:1


Verse of the Day

[ The Fool Says, There Is No God ] [ To the choirmaster. Of David. ] The fool says in his heart, “There is no God.” They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds, there is none who does good. Psalm 14:1 ESV

Psalm 14

The Fool Says, There Is No God

To the choirmaster. Of David.

14 The fool says in his heart, “There is no God.”
They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds,
there is none who does good.

The Lord looks down from heaven on the children of man,
to see if there are any who understand,[a]
who seek after God.

They have all turned aside; together they have become corrupt;
there is none who does good,
not even one.

Have they no knowledge, all the evildoers
who eat up my people as they eat bread
and do not call upon the Lord?

There they are in great terror,
for God is with the generation of the righteous.
You would shame the plans of the poor,
but[b] the Lord is his refuge.

Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion!
When the Lord restores the fortunes of his people,
let Jacob rejoice, let Israel be glad.

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 14:2 Or that act wisely
  2. Psalm 14:6 Or for

Verse of the Day 3-31-13 Isaiah 55


Verse of the Day

 Seek the Lord while he may be found; call upon him while he is near; let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts; let him return to the Lord, that he may have compassion on him, and to our God, for he will abundantly pardonFor my thoughts are not your thoughts,  neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord. Isaiah 55:6-8 ESV

 Isaiah 55

English Standard Version (ESV)

The Compassion of the Lord

55 “Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?
Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in rich food.
Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.
Behold, I made him a witness to the peoples,
a leader and commander for the peoples.
Behold, you shall call a nation that you do not know,
and a nation that did not know you shall run to you,
because of the Lord your God, and of the Holy One of Israel,
for he has glorified you.

“Seek the Lord while he may be found;
call upon him while he is near;
let the wicked forsake his way,
and the unrighteous man his thoughts;
let him return to the Lord, that he may have compassion on him,
and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.
For my thoughts are not your thoughts,
neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord.
For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
so are my ways higher than your ways
and my thoughts than your thoughts.

10 “For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven
and do not return there but water the earth,
making it bring forth and sprout,
giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater,
11 so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth;
it shall not return to me empty,
but it shall accomplish that which I purpose,
and shall succeed in the thing for which I sent it.

12 “For you shall go out in joy
and be led forth in peace;
the mountains and the hills before you
shall break forth into singing,
and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.
13 Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress;
instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle;
and it shall make a name for the Lord,
an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.”

 

Verse of the Day 2-4-13


Verse of the Day

Psalm 18 ] [ For the director of music. Of David the servant of the Lord. He sang to the Lord the words of this song when the Lord delivered him from the hand of all his enemies and from the hand of Saul. He said: ] I love you,Lord, my strength. The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer; my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.Psalm 18:1-2 NIV

Psalm 18[a]

For the director of music. Of David the servant of the Lord. He sang to the Lord the words of this song when the Lord delivered him from the hand of all his enemies and from the hand of Saul. He said:

I love you, Lord, my strength.

The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;
my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,
my shield[b] and the horn[c] of my salvation, my stronghold.

I called to the Lord, who is worthy of praise,
and I have been saved from my enemies.
The cords of death entangled me;
the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.
The cords of the grave coiled around me;
the snares of death confronted me.

In my distress I called to the Lord;
I cried to my God for help.
From his temple he heard my voice;
my cry came before him, into his ears.
The earth trembled and quaked,
and the foundations of the mountains shook;
they trembled because he was angry.
Smoke rose from his nostrils;
consuming fire came from his mouth,
burning coals blazed out of it.
He parted the heavens and came down;
dark clouds were under his feet.
10 He mounted the cherubim and flew;
he soared on the wings of the wind.
11 He made darkness his covering, his canopy around him—
the dark rain clouds of the sky.
12 Out of the brightness of his presence clouds advanced,
with hailstones and bolts of lightning.
13 The Lord thundered from heaven;
the voice of the Most High resounded.[d]
14 He shot his arrows and scattered the enemy,
with great bolts of lightning he routed them.
15 The valleys of the sea were exposed
and the foundations of the earth laid bare
at your rebuke, Lord,
at the blast of breath from your nostrils.

16 He reached down from on high and took hold of me;
he drew me out of deep waters.
17 He rescued me from my powerful enemy,
from my foes, who were too strong for me.
18 They confronted me in the day of my disaster,
but the Lord was my support.
19 He brought me out into a spacious place;
he rescued me because he delighted in me.

20 The Lord has dealt with me according to my righteousness;
according to the cleanness of my hands he has rewarded me.
21 For I have kept the ways of the Lord;
I am not guilty of turning from my God.
22 All his laws are before me;
I have not turned away from his decrees.
23 I have been blameless before him
and have kept myself from sin.
24 The Lord has rewarded me according to my righteousness,
according to the cleanness of my hands in his sight.

25 To the faithful you show yourself faithful,
to the blameless you show yourself blameless,
26 to the pure you show yourself pure,
but to the devious you show yourself shrewd.
27 You save the humble
but bring low those whose eyes are haughty.
28 You, Lord, keep my lamp burning;
my God turns my darkness into light.
29 With your help I can advance against a troop[e];
with my God I can scale a wall.

30 As for God, his way is perfect:
The Lord’s word is flawless;
he shields all who take refuge in him.
31 For who is God besides the Lord?
And who is the Rock except our God?
32 It is God who arms me with strength
and keeps my way secure.
33 He makes my feet like the feet of a deer;
he causes me to stand on the heights.
34 He trains my hands for battle;
my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
35 You make your saving help my shield,
and your right hand sustains me;
your help has made me great.
36 You provide a broad path for my feet,
so that my ankles do not give way.

37 I pursued my enemies and overtook them;
I did not turn back till they were destroyed.
38 I crushed them so that they could not rise;
they fell beneath my feet.
39 You armed me with strength for battle;
you humbled my adversaries before me.
40 You made my enemies turn their backs in flight,
and I destroyed my foes.
41 They cried for help, but there was no one to save them—
to the Lord, but he did not answer.
42 I beat them as fine as windblown dust;
I trampled them[f] like mud in the streets.
43 You have delivered me from the attacks of the people;
you have made me the head of nations.
People I did not know now serve me,
44  foreigners cower before me;
as soon as they hear of me, they obey me.
45 They all lose heart;
they come trembling from their strongholds.

46 The Lord lives! Praise be to my Rock!
Exalted be God my Savior!
47 He is the God who avenges me,
who subdues nations under me,
48  who saves me from my enemies.
You exalted me above my foes;
from a violent man you rescued me.
49 Therefore I will praise you, Lord, among the nations;
I will sing the praises of your name.

50 He gives his king great victories;
he shows unfailing love to his anointed,
to David and to his descendants forever.

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 18:1 In Hebrew texts 18:1-50 is numbered 18:2-51.
  2. Psalm 18:2 Or sovereign
  3. Psalm 18:2 Horn here symbolizes strength.
  4. Psalm 18:13 Some Hebrew manuscripts and Septuagint (see also 2 Samuel 22:14); most Hebrew manuscripts resounded, / amid hailstones and bolts of lightning
  5. Psalm 18:29 Or can run through a barricade
  6. Psalm 18:42 Many Hebrew manuscripts, Septuagint, Syriac and Targum (see also 2 Samuel 22:43); Masoretic Text I poured them out

Verse of the Day 2-3-13


Verse of the Day

But I will sing of your strength, in the morning I will sing of your love; for you are my fortress, my refuge in times of trouble. Psalm 59:16 NIV

Psalm 59[a]

For the director of music. To the tune of “Do Not Destroy.” Of David. A miktam.[b] When Saul had sent men to watch David’s house in order to kill him.

Deliver me from my enemies, O God;
be my fortress against those who are attacking me.
Deliver me from evildoers
and save me from those who are after my blood.

See how they lie in wait for me!
Fierce men conspire against me
for no offense or sin of mine, Lord.
I have done no wrong, yet they are ready to attack me.
Arise to help me; look on my plight!
You, Lord God Almighty,
you who are the God of Israel,
rouse yourself to punish all the nations;
show no mercy to wicked traitors.[c]

They return at evening,
snarling like dogs,
and prowl about the city.
See what they spew from their mouths—
the words from their lips are sharp as swords,
and they think, “Who can hear us?”
But you laugh at them, Lord;
you scoff at all those nations.

You are my strength, I watch for you;
you, God, are my fortress,
10     my God on whom I can rely.

God will go before me
and will let me gloat over those who slander me.
11 But do not kill them, Lord our shield,[d]
or my people will forget.
In your might uproot them
and bring them down.
12 For the sins of their mouths,
for the words of their lips,
let them be caught in their pride.
For the curses and lies they utter,
13   consume them in your wrath,
consume them till they are no more.
Then it will be known to the ends of the earth
that God rules over Jacob.

14 They return at evening,
snarling like dogs,
and prowl about the city.
15 They wander about for food
and howl if not satisfied.
16 But I will sing of your strength,
in the morning I will sing of your love;
for you are my fortress,
my refuge in times of trouble.

17 You are my strength, I sing praise to you;
you, God, are my fortress,
my God on whom I can rely.

Footnotes:

  1. Psalm 59:1 In Hebrew texts 59:1-17 is numbered 59:2-18.
  2. Psalm 59:1 Title: Probably a literary or musical term
  3. Psalm 59:5 The Hebrew has Selah (a word of uncertain meaning) here and at the end of verse 13.
  4. Psalm 59:11 Or sovereign

Psalm 146:1-10


English: Psalm 90 of The Holy Bible, King Jame...

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Words have a power all their own

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The Penance of David, Psalm 51

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Psalm 146
1 Praise the LORD.[a]

Praise the LORD, my soul.

2 I will praise the LORD all my life;
I will sing praise to my God as long as I live.
3 Do not put your trust in princes,
in human beings, who cannot save.
4 When their spirit departs, they return to the ground;
on that very day their plans come to nothing.
5 Blessed are those whose help is the God of Jacob,
whose hope is in the LORD their God.

6 He is the Maker of heaven and earth,
the sea, and everything in them—
he remains faithful forever.
7 He upholds the cause of the oppressed
and gives food to the hungry.
The LORD sets prisoners free,
8 the LORD gives sight to the blind,
the LORD lifts up those who are bowed down,
the LORD loves the righteous.
9 The LORD watches over the foreigner
and sustains the fatherless and the widow,
but he frustrates the ways of the wicked.

10 The LORD reigns forever,
your God, O Zion, for all generations.

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Psalm 27:1-14


jehovah-Exodus
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Psalm 27

1The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?

2When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat up my flesh, they stumbled and fell.

3Though an host should encamp against me, my heart shall not fear: though war should rise against me, in this will I be confident.

4One thing have I desired of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the LORD, and to enquire in his temple.

5For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion: in the secret of his tabernacle shall he hide me; he shall set me up upon a rock.

6And now shall mine head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me: therefore will I offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of joy; I will sing, yea, I will sing praises unto the LORD.

7Hear, O LORD, when I cry with my voice: have mercy also upon me, and answer me.

8When thou saidst, Seek ye my face; my heart said unto thee, Thy face, LORD, will I seek.

9Hide not thy face far from me; put not thy servant away in anger: thou hast been my help; leave me not, neither forsake me, O God of my salvation.

10When my father and my mother forsake me, then the LORD will take me up.

11Teach me thy way, O LORD, and lead me in a plain path, because of mine enemies.

12Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies: for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe out cruelty.

13I had fainted, unless I had believed to see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living.

14Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD.

PSALMS 27      Other translations  –  previous  –  next  –  meaning  –  Psalms  –  BM Home  –  Full Page

PSALM 27

A Psalm of David.

  1. jehovah is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? jehovah is the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid?
  2. When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat up my flesh, they stumbled and fell.
  3. If a host encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; when war shall rise against me, in this will I be confident.
  4. One thing have I asked of jehovah, that will I earnestly seek; that I may dwell in the house of jehovah all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of jehovah, and to inquire in his temple.
  5. For he will hide me in his tabernacle in the day of evil; he will conceal me in the secret place of his tent; he will set me high upon a rock.
  6. And now shall my head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me; and I will offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of shouting; I will sing hymns to jehovah.
  7. Hear my voice, O jehovah; I will cry, be merciful to me, and answer me.
  8. Unto you, my heart, Jehovah has said, Seek my face; your face, O jehovah, will I seek.
  9. Hide not your face from me; put not away your servant in anger; you have been my help; leave me not, neither forsake me, O god of my salvation.
  10. For my father and my mother have forsaken me, but jehovah will gather me.
  11. Teach me your way, O jehovah, and lead me in the path of rectitude because of mine enemies.
  12. Deliver me not over to the lust of mine enemies; for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe violence;
  13. Nevertheless, I firmly believe I shall see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living.
  14. Hope in jehovah, be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart; yea, hope you in jehovah.

The Internal Sense

The lord’s discourse with the father, that he is not afraid of the hells which fight against him, verses 1 to 3; of his union with the father, verses 4 to 10, 13, 14; that thereby he will subdue the hells, verses 11, 12.

Exposition

Verse 3. If a host encamp against me. Army signifies truths and goods; see AC 3348; and truths and goods are arranged by the lord according to heavenly order; hence, arrangement according to order is the encamping of an army, and the heavenly order itself, which is heaven, is the camp; this camp, or this order, is such that it cannot possibly be broken into by hell, although hell is in a continual endeavour to break into it; hence also that order or heaven is called a camp, and the truths and goods, that is, the angels, who are arranged according to that order, are called armies. Inasmuch as several expressions in the Word have an opposite sense, so also has camp, and, according to such sense, signifies evils and falses, consequently hell, as in David, “If a host encamp against me, my heart shall not fear, Psalm 27:3. AC 4236.

Verses 4, 5. One thing have I asked of jehovah, that will I earnestly seek, that I may dwell in the house of jehovah all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of jehovah, and to enquire in his temple; for he will, hide me in his tabernacle in the day of evil; he will conceal me in the secret place of his tent; he will set me high upon a rock. Mention is here made of the house of jehovah, of his temple, tent, and tabernacle, and by the house, of jehovah is signified the church which is in the good of love to the lord, by the temple the church which is in truths grounded in that good; by the tent of jehovah is signified Divine Truth, and by the tabernacle Divine Good; hence it is evident that by dwelling in the house of jehovah all the days of my life is not meant to dwell in the house of jehovah, but in the good of love to the lord, and that by visiting in the morning the temple of jehovah is not meant to visit it every morning, but to enquire after and seek the truths of that good; hence by hiding in the tent is signified to keep in Divine Truth, and to be protected from falses, and by being concealed in the secret place of the tabernacle is signified to keep in Divine good, and to be protected from evils; by being set up high on a rock is signified to instruct in the interior truths. AE 799.

In the supreme sense the lord, as to his Human Essence, is the tent, the tabernacle, and the temple. AC 414.

Verse 6. I will offer in his tabernacle the sacrifices of shouting. In the Word mention is made of various instruments, and each of them has its distinct signification, of which, by the Divine mercy of the lord, we shall speak in their proper places. At the present we shall confine ourselves to what is said in David, “I will sacrifice in the tabernacle of jehovah the sacrifices of shouting,” where by the tabernacle is meant the celestial principle, and by shouting, singing, and chanting is expressed the spiritual principle thence derived. AC 420.

Verse 9. Hide not your face from me; put not away your servant in anger. From the above explications it may be known what the face of jehovah, or the lord, signifies namely: the Divine love, and every good in heaven and the church thence derived; hence also may be known what is signified by hiding or concealing the face, where jehovah or the lord is treated of, namely: that it is to leave man in his own proprium, and thence in evils and falses which gush out from the proprium. For man, viewed in himself, is nothing but evil and the falses thence derived, and is withheld from them by the lord that he may be in good, which is effected by an elevation from the proprium. Hence it may be manifest that by hiding and concealing the face, when it relates to the lord, is signified to leave man in evils and falses, as in the following passages, “On account of all their wickedness I have concealed my faces from this city,” Jeremiah 33:5: and in Isaiah, “Your sins have hid the faces of god from you, that he did not hear,” Is 59:2; and in David, “Hide not your faces from me, put not away your servant in anger,” Psalm xxvii. AE 412.

Verse 10. For my father and mother have forsaken me, and jehovah will gather me. Father and mother here denote good and truth, which are said to have forsaken, when man observes that of himself he is not able to do any thing good, or to know any thing true; that it is not to be understood as if David was forsaken by his father and mother is manifest. AC 3703.

Verse 13. I nevertheless firmly believe I shall see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living. Inasmuch as death signifies damnation and hell, hence life on the other hand signifies salvation and heaven, as in Matthew, “Strait is the gate and narrow is the way that leads to life,” Matt 7:14: again, “If you will enter into life, keep the commandments,” Matt 19:17. Hence it is that salvation is called eternal life, as in Matthew 19:24; Mark 10:24; 30; Luke 10:25; and that heaven is called the land of the living, as in David, “jehovah, you are my confidence, my portion in the land of the living,” Psalm 142:5; again, “That you may see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living.” AE 186.

The Translator’s Notes and Observations

Verse 1. jehovah is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? jehovah is the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid? In the original Hebrew two distinct terms are used to express what is here rendered I fear and shall be afraid, and hence we may safely conclude that two distinct ideas were intended to be suggested. It is not easy to say what these two distinct ideas are, but it appears most probable, from the proper sense of the two Hebrew terms which are here rendered I fear and am afraid, that the former term has more respect to fear, as an internal principle manifesting itself in the human heart, and the latter term has relation to the external effect of that fear in causing symptoms of outward trembling and agitation.

Verse 2. When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat my flesh, they stumbled and fell. The wicked are here called enemies and foes, probably for the purpose of expressing their two fold opposition to the divine good and the divine truth, and thus their two fold purpose of destroying in man both the love of good, and the understanding of truth, which is to eat up his flesh.

Verse 6. I will offer in his tabernacle the sacrifices of shouting. In the received English version of the Psalms, what is here rendered shouting is expressed by the term joy, but in the original Hebrew the term is derived from a root expressive of the elevation of the voice in the way of shouting, and accordingly it follows, “I will sing a hymn to jehovah.”

Verse 11. Teach me your way, O jehovah, and lead me in the path of rectitude. For the distinct meaning of the two terms way and path, see the Translator’s notes and observations on Psalm xxv.

PSALMS 27    Other translations  –  previous  –  next  –  meaning  –  Psalms  –  BM Home  –  Full Page

Psalm 27July 11, 1999

The Light that Dispels Fear

How you can tell when it’s going to be a rotten day:

You see a “60 Minutes” news team waiting in your office.

You call Suicide Prevention and they put you on hold.

Your birthday cake collapses from the weight of the candles.

Your twin sister forgot your birthday.

Your car horn goes off accidentally and remains stuck as you follow a group of Hell’s Angels on the freeway.

Your boss tells you not to bother to take off your coat.

The bird singing outside your window is a buzzard.

Your income tax check bounces.

You put both contact lenses in the same eye.

Your wife says, “Good morning, Mike”, and your name is George.

There are times in our lives when our world comes crashing down on us; if anything can go wrong, it will. When life seems to be going in a downward spiral, you’re at the end of your rope and you can’t tie a knot to hold on – fear often takes hold of us. Fear traps us in the belief that nothing will ever improve, that we are ensnared and will never escape. When life gets us down, fear fills the void left by hope.  Fear is not the domain of the timid, but swells over all of us no matter how brave we may appear to be.  Julius Caesar once remarked that even the shouts of his enemies were music to his ears, but he was terribly afraid of thunder. When it vaguely looked like a storm was brewing, he began to shiver and shake. Peter the Great, considered by many to have been the greatest czar of Russia was terrified to cross a bridge. He would tremble in his boots whenever he stepped onto a bridge. King Louis the XV, of France, was so afraid of death the he ordered the subject off limits in his presence. Stalin was constantly in fear of being poisoned or killed. He had 8 bedrooms which could be locked up like safes in a bank. Nobody ever knew in which of these bedrooms he slept on any given night.

We fear losing our health, our wealth, our family; our friends. We fear losing the promotion or even the job. We fear growing old, but even more, we fear death. On his return visit to many parts of the world, Herbert Hoover was asked by a reporter what, in his judgment, was the prevailing mood of the peoples in the lands he had visited. “The dominant emotion everywhere in the world is fear. This applies to every part of human activity; finance, industry, farmers, workers, thinkers, and government officials.”

God has an answer to our problem of fear. The answer to our fears, the solution to our worries lies in the simple understanding of God’s presence.
Fear is disabled by God’s presence  – verses 1-6

God’s presence supersedes God’s enemies  – verses 1-3

King David, who penned these words in Psalm 27, knew the meaning of the word fear better than most. His life consisted of one vicious attack on his life after another. For years he was the number one fugitive in Israel, always hiding from the wrath of King Saul. Later on, his life was threatened by the revolt of his own son Absalom.

We may not find ourselves as outcasts, pursued by potential murderers, with our lives on the line. But our problems still plague us. Our hope evaporates as our resources diminish fast. We may feel that to be left at the mercy of circumstances, under their tyranny, is to be torn apart and left with nothing. David begins with a sense of certainty, of calm in the midst of a storm.  The starting point for David and us are not the circumstances, are not the problems, but the God who is in control of all those circumstances. David does not deny the situations he faces, but those situations do not define for David how he is to respond.  During World War II, a military governor met with General George Patton in Sicily. When he praised Patton for his courage and bravery, the general replied, “Sir, I am not a brave man. . . The truth is, I am an utter craven coward. I have never been within the sound of gunshot or in sight of battle in my whole life that I wasn’t so scared that I had sweat in the palms of my hands. I learned very early in my life never to take counsel of my fears.” Our circumstances must never be what defines our life. Rather than taking counsel of our fears, we must see our life in a much larger perspective. There is nothing so dark and gloomy as fear, nothing so unsettling than being afraid. But when we are intimidated by people, or discouraged by circumstances, God’s presence provides a defense against these frightening circumstances. It is not said merely that the Lord gives light, but that He “is” light; nor that He gives salvation, but that He is salvation. God does not just help us discover a refuge, a place where we are safe; it is He who is our safety. We do not ask Him to give us these things as though they are independent of God, but they describe who our God is.  God’s presence is the light which chases away the shadows of despair. It is in the darkness that our fears take on the horrible shapes of monsters. That is true whether we are four or forty. We live without all the facts, we live in the dark, so our fears become all the more fearsome.  The answer comes not in our manipulation of our circumstances so that peace reigns in our lives. Rather trusting in God’s presence, knowing that He is sovereign, in control, that it is He who is the light in every dark corner of our life – then we can cease being intimidated by the unknown, frightened by the terrors of life. The doom of depression must be expelled by the light of the Gospel. 

Because God is light, because He has guaranteed salvation, because He is a fortress against whatever evil comes our way – its success is never outside the providence of our God; it will never succeed. The reason is simple. God’s control is never undermined. We must know who is all powerful, who is the Creator, who is in charge.

 I recall as a Cub Scout going on a trip to the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland to see a demonstration of military power. While the thunderous explosions delighted the crowd of eight year old boys, the best part was when we got to climb on and in the tanks. But as we raced toward the machinery which had beaten back the Nazi onslaught a generation before, after seeing the power which fought in Korea and was building up in Southeast Asia – it was strange that we were told to be careful as we climbed on these steal beasts. We were cautioned not that we could be hurt, but that we might hurt the tanks.  In the same way, we can have confidence that no harm can come. When evil comes our way, it is never greater than our God. Verse 2 – they’ll stumble and fall, they’ll trip over the laces of their sandals. Even in the anticipation of troubles (verse 3) there can be courage. God’s presence supersedes God’s enemies because…

God’s presence is seen in God’s place  – verses 4-6

The reason for David’s certainty of God’s protection came not on a whim or based on a fleeting dream. But it came about because with singleness of mind, David’s full attention is focused on God’s presence which was seen in God’s dwelling place. David knows that only here can he find the comfort to endure troubling times. There is no other answer, no other solution. With clarity of purpose – the answer lies in God’s house.  David may be expressing a desire to lay aside the stature of the crown for the robes of the tabernacle priests, if that were possible. Or he could be expressing a longing to get away from the pressures of the battlefield and join the rest of Israel in the worship of God. Whatever was his desire, his goal was clear – he knew that it was only by focusing his attention on the beauty of the Lord, seeking Him in his temple that he could find the safety he needed.  What does that mean – that we’ve got to live each day of our life inside the church? In terms of safety statistics, that’s not a bad idea. 20% of all fatal accidents occur in automobiles; 17% of all fatal accidents occur at home; 16% of all fatal accidents occur in plains, trains, and boats; but only 0.001% of all fatal accidents occur in church, so obviously the safest place to be is in church, as much as possible! The reason is much more sensible than that. Seeing God in the sunshine of worship, you can have confidence in the shadows of life. Fear fades when we see a sovereign God who gives us mercy. Worship and worry can not live in the same heart; they are mutually exclusive. When we fill our minds with who our God is, when we are reminded what He has done for His people, worry begins to fade away.  The focus of the worship in the Old Testament was not the personal needs of the congregation, it was not to offer tidbits of self-help, it was not witty sayings to make one smile. The focus of the worship was God and His work for His people. For that very reason we don’t show up here to see and be seen, we do not come be entertained and made to feel more secure in our sin. Rather the object of our worship is the Triune God. 

The trouble is we are so often busy with so much, that the Sabbath has lost its meaning. There are ball games and family gatherings, there is shopping and cleaning, there is just a little more sleep. But as we crowd out the worship of God from our lives, it is no wonder that fear takes the place of worship. They are mutually exclusive.

Fear is dismantled by God’s grace   – verses 7-14

God’s grace accepts fearful people  – verses 7-10

Having expressed the certainty that despite the mounting troubles he faces, David knows the answer to his fears is found in worship. In verses 7-14 there is a shift in the Psalm from the positive declaration that the evil men will fail to a plaintive cry for help. In the second half of the Psalm we hear the content of his worship. But it is not just pollyannaish musings. David cries to the Lord. He recognizes that for God to rescue him, for God to deal with his fears, is an act of God’s grace.
 
David doesn’t try to argue his case before God that he is worthy of God’s time. He knows he does not deserve God’s grace, but petitions God to listen based on God’s character.
 
Some people say that maturity is demonstrated by faith that never struggles, by rising above the tide of this grimy world and living in some kind of exalted plane where you are never uncertain, never afraid, never assailed. But David’s struggle is refreshingly real. Knowing that God is sovereign, that He will never leave us or forsake us is foundational to our Christian life, but that never means we won’t wonder “why?”
 
David approaches God because of God’s grace which allows him to come.
 
It would be not only presumptuous to barge into the Oval Office, it would be downright deadly. The Secret Service is well armed and only a deranged man would dare to be so bold. How much more dangerous to go before God? But David knows he can pray, he can worship because he comes with an invitation in hand. God accepts fearful people like David, like me.
 
To seek the face of a king meant to seek his favor and forgiveness and mercy. This doesn’t mean: seek what God can do for you, but rather, to seek Him. Come to Him not only to receive gifts or relief from your troubles or answers to your prayers, but to know Him.
 
In verse 9 David is distressed; it seems that he is uncertain as to what God will do.
He does not want God to conceal His face. He does not want to lose the intimacy, the personal communication he has with God at this point. David doesn’t want God to shoo him away in disgust, ignore him and forget him. But then at the end there is a confession, an acknowledgment that God will not do this: “you have been my helper.”
 
In the past God has been there. So, since God does not change, he has nothing to worry about. God will not leave him. As unlikely as it is for parents to abandon their children, yet it happens – God would never do that. As unthinkable as it is for a mother to forget she has kids, God even more so will never forget you belong to Him.

God’s grace teaches fearful people 11-14

David is not asking for an easy way out. He is asking God to instruct him so he will know what to do. Not “God, fix this so my life will be simple.” But “God, help me to endure this situation without harming your name.” This is a dangerous prayer to make, but one which is very necessary. David prays to know God’s way through the difficult situation. He wants the straight path because of the oppressors. The level place, the straight path, is the word which means “uprightness.” He asks God to show him how to live righteously, correctly, in the face of those that are lying about him. In verse 12 the form of attack seems not so much battle, but vicious speech. In battle you die but once, but with a false witness you die a thousand deaths. If he responds in fear, he could lash out at his enemies, but God’s way may be different. It is very tempting to return insult for insult, false information for their lies. But David knows, having seen God’s character as he worshipped, that David could not speak that which is not true.  

David then believed that he would still enjoy the goodness of God in this world; although he was now deprived of all experience of His favor, and could see no spark of light, he is certain of one truth: God’s goodness will be evident even in this life. Sometimes the Lord calms the storm. Sometimes he lets the storm rage and calms His child.

 David concludes with the simple, but profound advice: wait That is a word we never like to hear. Little children whine when told to wait, and the complaining does not diminish with age. But contained within the word “wait” we have a clue as to what waiting does. The origin of the word is to twist, stretch. The tension which occurs during the time of waiting is what produces the strength which is the benefit of waiting. A rope is made strong by the twisting of the fibers together so that it can take the tension when the time of testing comes. You and I likewise are made strong by God’s grace when He puts us under pressure.  The admonition to be strong and take heart is the same form found in Joshua 1:9 where Joshua is told not to be discouraged, not to fear. What then is the man or woman to do in the face of adverse circumstances? He or she is to wait….but that implies hope, a confidence in God that He will answer the prayer and vindicate the oppressed.

Our world is impatient. We want everything right now. We’ve got instant tea and instant coffee, instant computers and instant banking, instant cameras and instant re-dial on our phones. There’s a sign in a shop in Pennsylvania that reads, “Antiques Made While You Wait.” That’s almost as stupid as the one that said, “Ears Pierced While You Wait.” (You don’t leave them there and pick them up later!) Some things that are worthwhile don’t come instantly. Maturity, character, wisdom, perceptiveness, and holiness do not come quickly. All through the Scriptures, God tells us, be patient for the coming of the Lord; wait on the Lord; they that wait on the Lord shall renew their strength; don’t grow weary in doing good, for in due season you will reap a harvest if you don’t give up. Yet we are an impatient lot.

When our family is in a turmoil, we become fearful. When our finances are a shambles, we fret over the checkbook. We want answers immediately. But God commands us to be patient, to wait. He’s won the victory. Sometimes we can do little except to wait and believe. A Jewish refugee wrote an inscription on a wall outside Cologne, Germany, during World War II: “I believe in the sun, even when it’s not shining. I believe in love even when I’m alone. And I believe in God even when He’s silent.”
 
But God has spoken. God has an answer for you and me. On what basis can we be certain that our fears will not come true, that God will leave us to be destroyed by whatever monsters plague us by day and night? This may have been David’s story, but I’m not David. How can we claim this fearlessness in the face of frightening circumstances? How can we know the presence of God’s grace? While this Psalm was written by David about some unknown circumstances in his life, there was another one who knew even greater danger, more fearsome situations and who found His refuge in the Lord.
 
We can have confidence that God is our light, our salvation and our refuge, for it was His own Son who, while evil men came to take Him to be falsely tried and murdered, spoke and they fell to the ground. It was Jesus who knew far better than any of us the horrors of abandonment as He hung on the Cross, as He cried out to His Father, “My God, My God why have you forsaken me?” But He was not completely rejected – for the Father received Him, as we know, on the third day when He rose from the dead. It was then that He could see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.
 
His success is now ours – not just by example, but by imputation. Jesus Christ is the light of the world; with Him we will never walk in darkness. Christ will keep us safe; He is the rock on which we are set secure.
PSALMS 27      Other translations  –  previous  –  next  –  meaning  –  Psalms  –  BM Home  –  Full Page

PSALM 27

A Psalm of David.

  1. jehovah is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? jehovah is the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid?
  2. When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat up my flesh, they stumbled and fell.
  3. If a host encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; when war shall rise against me, in this will I be confident.
  4. One thing have I asked of jehovah, that will I earnestly seek; that I may dwell in the house of jehovah all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of jehovah, and to inquire in his temple.
  5. For he will hide me in his tabernacle in the day of evil; he will conceal me in the secret place of his tent; he will set me high upon a rock.
  6. And now shall my head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me; and I will offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of shouting; I will sing hymns to jehovah.
  7. Hear my voice, O jehovah; I will cry, be merciful to me, and answer me.
  8. Unto you, my heart, Jehovah has said, Seek my face; your face, O jehovah, will I seek.
  9. Hide not your face from me; put not away your servant in anger; you have been my help; leave me not, neither forsake me, O god of my salvation.
  10. For my father and my mother have forsaken me, but jehovah will gather me.
  11. Teach me your way, O jehovah, and lead me in the path of rectitude because of mine enemies.
  12. Deliver me not over to the lust of mine enemies; for false witnesses are risen up against me, and such as breathe violence;
  13. Nevertheless, I firmly believe I shall see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living.
  14. Hope in jehovah, be of good courage, and he shall strengthen your heart; yea, hope you in jehovah.

The Internal Sense

The lord’s discourse with the father, that he is not afraid of the hells which fight against him, verses 1 to 3; of his union with the father, verses 4 to 10, 13, 14; that thereby he will subdue the hells, verses 11, 12.

Exposition

Verse 3. If a host encamp against me. Army signifies truths and goods; see AC 3348; and truths and goods are arranged by the lord according to heavenly order; hence, arrangement according to order is the encamping of an army, and the heavenly order itself, which is heaven, is the camp; this camp, or this order, is such that it cannot possibly be broken into by hell, although hell is in a continual endeavour to break into it; hence also that order or heaven is called a camp, and the truths and goods, that is, the angels, who are arranged according to that order, are called armies. Inasmuch as several expressions in the Word have an opposite sense, so also has camp, and, according to such sense, signifies evils and falses, consequently hell, as in David, “If a host encamp against me, my heart shall not fear, Psalm 27:3. AC 4236.

Verses 4, 5. One thing have I asked of jehovah, that will I earnestly seek, that I may dwell in the house of jehovah all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of jehovah, and to enquire in his temple; for he will, hide me in his tabernacle in the day of evil; he will conceal me in the secret place of his tent; he will set me high upon a rock. Mention is here made of the house of jehovah, of his temple, tent, and tabernacle, and by the house, of jehovah is signified the church which is in the good of love to the lord, by the temple the church which is in truths grounded in that good; by the tent of jehovah is signified Divine Truth, and by the tabernacle Divine Good; hence it is evident that by dwelling in the house of jehovah all the days of my life is not meant to dwell in the house of jehovah, but in the good of love to the lord, and that by visiting in the morning the temple of jehovah is not meant to visit it every morning, but to enquire after and seek the truths of that good; hence by hiding in the tent is signified to keep in Divine Truth, and to be protected from falses, and by being concealed in the secret place of the tabernacle is signified to keep in Divine good, and to be protected from evils; by being set up high on a rock is signified to instruct in the interior truths. AE 799.

In the supreme sense the lord, as to his Human Essence, is the tent, the tabernacle, and the temple. AC 414.

Verse 6. I will offer in his tabernacle the sacrifices of shouting. In the Word mention is made of various instruments, and each of them has its distinct signification, of which, by the Divine mercy of the lord, we shall speak in their proper places. At the present we shall confine ourselves to what is said in David, “I will sacrifice in the tabernacle of jehovah the sacrifices of shouting,” where by the tabernacle is meant the celestial principle, and by shouting, singing, and chanting is expressed the spiritual principle thence derived. AC 420.

Verse 9. Hide not your face from me; put not away your servant in anger. From the above explications it may be known what the face of jehovah, or the lord, signifies namely: the Divine love, and every good in heaven and the church thence derived; hence also may be known what is signified by hiding or concealing the face, where jehovah or the lord is treated of, namely: that it is to leave man in his own proprium, and thence in evils and falses which gush out from the proprium. For man, viewed in himself, is nothing but evil and the falses thence derived, and is withheld from them by the lord that he may be in good, which is effected by an elevation from the proprium. Hence it may be manifest that by hiding and concealing the face, when it relates to the lord, is signified to leave man in evils and falses, as in the following passages, “On account of all their wickedness I have concealed my faces from this city,” Jeremiah 33:5: and in Isaiah, “Your sins have hid the faces of god from you, that he did not hear,” Is 59:2; and in David, “Hide not your faces from me, put not away your servant in anger,” Psalm xxvii. AE 412.

Verse 10. For my father and mother have forsaken me, and jehovah will gather me. Father and mother here denote good and truth, which are said to have forsaken, when man observes that of himself he is not able to do any thing good, or to know any thing true; that it is not to be understood as if David was forsaken by his father and mother is manifest. AC 3703.

Verse 13. I nevertheless firmly believe I shall see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living. Inasmuch as death signifies damnation and hell, hence life on the other hand signifies salvation and heaven, as in Matthew, “Strait is the gate and narrow is the way that leads to life,” Matt 7:14: again, “If you will enter into life, keep the commandments,” Matt 19:17. Hence it is that salvation is called eternal life, as in Matthew 19:24; Mark 10:24; 30; Luke 10:25; and that heaven is called the land of the living, as in David, “jehovah, you are my confidence, my portion in the land of the living,” Psalm 142:5; again, “That you may see the goodness of jehovah in the land of the living.” AE 186.

The Translator’s Notes and Observations

Verse 1. jehovah is my light and my salvation, whom shall I fear? jehovah is the strength of my life, of whom shall I be afraid? In the original Hebrew two distinct terms are used to express what is here rendered I fear and shall be afraid, and hence we may safely conclude that two distinct ideas were intended to be suggested. It is not easy to say what these two distinct ideas are, but it appears most probable, from the proper sense of the two Hebrew terms which are here rendered I fear and am afraid, that the former term has more respect to fear, as an internal principle manifesting itself in the human heart, and the latter term has relation to the external effect of that fear in causing symptoms of outward trembling and agitation.

Verse 2. When the wicked, even mine enemies and my foes, came upon me to eat my flesh, they stumbled and fell. The wicked are here called enemies and foes, probably for the purpose of expressing their two fold opposition to the divine good and the divine truth, and thus their two fold purpose of destroying in man both the love of good, and the understanding of truth, which is to eat up his flesh.

Verse 6. I will offer in his tabernacle the sacrifices of shouting. In the received English version of the Psalms, what is here rendered shouting is expressed by the term joy, but in the original Hebrew the term is derived from a root expressive of the elevation of the voice in the way of shouting, and accordingly it follows, “I will sing a hymn to jehovah.”

Verse 11. Teach me your way, O jehovah, and lead me in the path of rectitude. For the distinct meaning of the two terms way and path, see the Translator’s notes and observations on Psalm xxv.

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Psalms
A collection of 150 psalms, whose Hebrew name is “The Book of Praise.” Authors of individual psalms include David, Solomon, Moses, Asaph, and others who are anonymous. The variety and unity of Psalms have given this book a unique place in the devotional life of the individual and the Church. Almost every aspect of man’s relation to God is depicted in these poems: simple trust, the sense of sin, appeal to a higher power in time of trouble, and the conviction that the world is in the hands of a loving God.

Sermon Notes

Psalm 39:1-13


King David in Prayer

Image via Wikipedia

English: Scroll of the Book of Proverbs
Image via Wikipedia

Psalm 39

1I said, I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not with my tongue: I will keep my mouth with a bridle, while the wicked is before me.

2I was dumb with silence, I held my peace, even from good; and my sorrow was stirred.

3My heart was hot within me, while I was musing the fire burned: then spake I with my tongue,

4LORD, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is: that I may know how frail I am.

5Behold, thou hast made my days as an handbreadth; and mine age is as nothing before thee: verily every man at his best state is altogether vanity. Selah.

6Surely every man walketh in a vain shew: surely they are disquieted in vain: he heapeth up riches, and knoweth not who shall gather them.

7And now, Lord, what wait I for? my hope is in thee.

8Deliver me from all my transgressions: make me not the reproach of the foolish.

9I was dumb, I opened not my mouth; because thou didst it.

10Remove thy stroke away from me: I am consumed by the blow of thine hand.

11When thou with rebukes dost correct man for iniquity, thou makest his beauty to consume away like a moth: surely every man is vanity. Selah.

12Hear my prayer, O LORD, and give ear unto my cry; hold not thy peace at my tears: for I am a stranger with thee, and a sojourner, as all my fathers were.

13O spare me, that I may recover strength, before I go hence, and be no more.

Psalm Commentaries >

A Summary of Psalm 39: From Silence to Speech

Psalm Category:

Lament

Central Thought:

In Psalm 39, David moves from the pain of silence, to the power of speech, to a prayer for divine speech.

Key Word:

Selem (v. 6). Selem is translated as “phantom” in verse 6. It could also be translated as “shadow” or “image.” Selem is used in Genesis 1:26-27, where it refers to man being made in the “image” of God. This reminds us that when men and women deny the Creator and embrace only the creation, they deny the purpose for which they were created and become mere phantoms, hollow images, and a vain breath.

Have you ever been upset with God or confused by His actions? In Psalm 39, David is both upset and confused. He is experiencing God’s discipline and questioning the meaning of life—even life in the covenant.

The Pain of Silence (vv. 1-3): David begins this psalm in silence. He desires to talk, but is holding back. He is “muzzling” his mouth. The reason David is remaining silent is a noble one: He does not want to voice his thoughts before the “wicked” (v. 1). He fears that speaking will bring indignity to God’s name. Oftentimes silence is a wise course of action before both God (Hab. 2:20; Lev. 10:3) and men (Prov. 17:28; Job 2:13). However, silence can also be sinful (Ps. 32:3; Hab. 1:13), and, as Psalm 39 reveals, harmful. David’s silence only makes his anguish worse (v. 2). His soul is in turmoil, is boiling over, until he finally gives way to speech (v. 3). Like the prophet Jeremiah, David can no longer keep silent regarding the fire in his bones (Jer. 20:9).

The Power of Speech (vv. 4-11): When David opens his mouth he speaks directly to God: “Show me, O Lord” (v. 4). He begins to unfold what is troubling him so. In verses. 4-5 he reveals that he is troubled by the brevity of human life. Does this ever trouble you? In verse 6, he notes that he is also troubled by the seeming meaninglessness of life. Here David echoes Ecclesiastes 1:2, “Vanity of vanities! All is vanity.” Do such things ever trouble you? David is experiencing the severe discipline of God, and he is wondering about the meaning of life. He is particularly wondering if the believer is any better off than the unbeliever. Again David’s pathos is captured in a verse from Ecclesiastes, “For the wise man, like the fool, will not be long remembered; in days to come both will be forgotten. Like the fool, the wise man too must die!” (2:16). It is important for us to note that God does not chastise David for asking such questions. It is also crucial for us to realize that David’s lament is not an act of unfaithfulness, but rather an act of worship. One of the errors of the modern evangelical church is that it can conceive of worship as nothing other than bongos, guitars, and happy songs. In contrast, the Bible, particularly the Book of Psalms, reminds us that lament is worship as well. David is not directing his lament and his questions to a physician, therapist, or philosopher; he is directing them to Yahweh. David recognizes that the God who is disciplining him severely (vv. 9-11) is the very same God who is his only hope for deliverance (v. 7).

A Prayer for Divine Speech (vv. 12-13): David began this psalm in silence and then moved to speech. As he concludes this psalm, he asks God to break His silence as well. David’s explicit petition to God to “hear,” “listen,” and be “not deaf” is also an implied petition for divine speech. David asks God to be God, to distinguish Himself from the idols which have neither ears to hear nor lips with which to speak. David realizes if God remains silent then he will be an “alien,” a “stranger,” and will be “no more.” The good news for David, and for you, is that God does not remain silent like the idols (see Isa. 42:14-17). God addresses the issues of the nature and meaning of life as He addresses all other issues—in His Son. God broke His silence in Jesus Christ, “In the past God spoke to our forefathers through the prophets at many times and in various ways, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son” (Heb. 1:1-2).

Psalms:

A collection of 150 psalms, whose Hebrew name is “The Book of Praise.” Authors of individual psalms include David, Solomon, Moses, Asaph, and others who are anonymous. The variety and unity of Psalms have given this book a unique place in the devotional life of the individual and the Church. Almost every aspect of man’s relation to God is depicted in these poems: simple trust, the sense of sin, appeal to a higher power in time of trouble, and the conviction that the world is in the hands of a loving God.

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PSALM 39

“To him that presides over the music, to Jeduthun, a Psalm of David.

  1. I said, I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not with my tongue; I will keep a check upon my mouth, while the wicked is before me.
  2. I was dumb with silence, I refrained from speaking even of good; my sorrow was stirred.
  3. My heart was hot in the midst of me, in my moaning the fire kindled; I spoke with my tongue:
  4. Make known to me, O jehovah, my end, and the measure of my days what it is; that I may know how frail I am.
  5. Behold, you have made my days as a hand-breadth, and my age is as nothing before you; verily every man at his best state is altogether vanity. Selah.
  6. Surely man walks as a shadowy image, surely they are disquieted in vain; he heaps up riches and knows not who shall gather them.
  7. And now, O lord, what wait I for? My hope is in you.
  8. Deliver me from all my transgressions; make me not the reproach of the foolish.
  9. I will be dumb; I will open not my mouth; for you have done it.
  10. Remove your plague away from me; I am consumed by the stroke of your hand.
  11. With rebukes do you chastise man for iniquity; you make his beauty to waste away like a moth; surely every man is vanity. Selah.
  12. Hear my prayer, O jehovah, and give ear to my cry; be not silent at my tears; for I am a sojourner with you, a stranger as all my fathers were.
  13. Look upon me that I may recover strength, before I go hence and be no more.

The Internal Sense

The lord’s patience in a state of temptations, verses 1 to 3, 8 to 11; that he wishes the end of them, verses 4 to 7; a prayer to the father that he may not be deserted, verses 12, 13.

Exposition

Verses 4, 5, Make known to me, O jehovah, my end, and the measure of my days, what it is, that I may know how frail I am. Behold, you have made my days as a hand-breadth, and mine age is as nothing before you. It appears as if by these words were meant only times of life, the end of which he is desirous to know, and that they quickly pass away: but in the spiritual sense, are not meant times, but instead of times, states of life, wherefore by make known to me, O jehovah, my end, the measure of my days, what it is, is signified that he may know the state of his life and its quality, thus what would continue to be the quality of his life; by behold, you have made my days as a hand-breadth, is signified that the quality of the state of his life is of little moment; and by my time being as nothing before you, is signified that the state of his life is of no avail: for time and days signify states of life as to truth and as to good, and hence as to intelligence and wisdom, consequently that the former and the latter, so far as they are from himself, are of no account: that this is the meaning of the words cannot be seen by those who only think naturally, because natural thought cannot be separated from the idea of time, but spiritual thought, such as angelic thought is, has nothing in common with time, nor with space, nor with person. AE 629.

Verse 10, Remove your plague away from me, I am consumed by the stroke of your hand. By plagues, in the Word, are signified such things as destroy spiritual life with men, and consequently the church, and of course things which induce death, understood in a spiritual sense, which in general, have reference to the cupidities arising from the loves of self and of the world; for these loves are the roots from which evils and falses of every genus and species bud forth and are born. AE 584.

In the Word in many passages it is said of jehovah, that he burns with anger, and is angry, and also that he consumes and destroys; but it is so expressed because it so appears to man, who turns himself away from the lord, as is the case when he does evil; and whereas on such occasions he is not heard, and is also punished, he believes that the lord is in anger with him, when yet the lord is in no case angry, and in no case consumes, for he is mercy itself, and good itself: hence it is evident what the quality of the Word is as to the letter, namely that it is according to appearance with man. In like manner, when it is said that, jehovah repents, as in what follows, when yet, jehovah in no case repents, for he foresees all things from eternity: hence also it may be manifest into how many errors they fall, who do not think beyond the sense of the letter, when they read the Word, thus who read it without doctrine from the Word, which doctrine teaches how the case is: for they who read the Word from doctrine, know that jehovah is mercy itself, and good itself, and that it cannot in any way be said of infinite mercy, and of infinite goodness, that it burns with anger and consumes; wherefore from that doctrine they know and see that it is so said according to the appearance presented to man. AC 10431.

Verse 12, For I am a sojourner, with you, a stranger as all my fathers were. By a sojourner are signified those who were instructed in the truths of the church, and who received those truths, but by a stranger are meant those who were not willing to be instructed in the truths of the church, because they were not willing to receive them. AC 8002.

The Translator’s Notes and Observations

Verse 12, Hear my prayer, O jehovah, give ear to my cry. A distinction is here made between prayers and a cry, also, between hearing and giving ear to: the distinction probably is grounded in what subsists between the will and the understanding, prayer having relation to the affection of the will in its application to the almighty, and cry having relation to the thought of the understanding on the same occasion. The almighty therefore is said to hear the former, and to give ear to the latter, to instruct us, that though he is attentive to both, yet his attention is more fixed on a devout desire of the heart, than on an enlightened application of the intellect.

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Psalm 9:1-20, Psalm 10:1-18


Teach me Thy Way, O Lord

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" O Lord, praise to You! You are the ligh...
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Psalm 9

1I will praise thee, O LORD, with my whole heart; I will shew forth all thy marvellous works.

2I will be glad and rejoice in thee: I will sing praise to thy name, O thou most High.

3When mine enemies are turned back, they shall fall and perish at thy presence.

4For thou hast maintained my right and my cause; thou satest in the throne judging right.

5Thou hast rebuked the heathen, thou hast destroyed the wicked, thou hast put out their name for ever and ever.

6O thou enemy, destructions are come to a perpetual end: and thou hast destroyed cities; their memorial is perished with them.

7But the LORD shall endure for ever: he hath prepared his throne for judgment.

8And he shall judge the world in righteousness, he shall minister judgment to the people in uprightness.

9The LORD also will be a refuge for the oppressed, a refuge in times of trouble.

10And they that know thy name will put their trust in thee: for thou, LORD, hast not forsaken them that seek thee.

11Sing praises to the LORD, which dwelleth in Zion: declare among the people his doings.

12When he maketh inquisition for blood, he remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the humble.

13Have mercy upon me, O LORD; consider my trouble which I suffer of them that hate me, thou that liftest me up from the gates of death:

14That I may shew forth all thy praise in the gates of the daughter of Zion: I will rejoice in thy salvation.

15The heathen are sunk down in the pit that they made: in the net which they hid is their own foot taken.

16The LORD is known by the judgment which he executeth: the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands. Higgaion. Selah.

17The wicked shall be turned into hell, and all the nations that forget God. For the needy shall not always be forgotten: the expectation of the poor shall not perish for ever.

19Arise, O LORD; let not man prevail: let the heathen be judged in thy sight.

20Put them in fear, O LORD: that the nations may know themselves to be but men. Selah.

Psalm 10

1Why standest thou afar off, O LORD? why hidest thou thyself in times of trouble?

2The wicked in his pride doth persecute the poor: let them be taken in the devices that they have imagined.

3For the wicked boasteth of his heart’s desire, and blesseth the covetous, whom the LORD abhorreth.

4The wicked, through the pride of his countenance, will not seek after God: God is not in all his thoughts.

5His ways are always grievous; thy judgments are far above out of his sight: as for all his enemies, he puffeth at them.

6He hath said in his heart, I shall not be moved: for I shall never be in adversity.

7His mouth is full of cursing and deceit and fraud: under his tongue is mischief and vanity.

8He sitteth in the lurking places of the villages: in the secret places doth he murder the innocent: his eyes are privily set against the poor.

9He lieth in wait secretly as a lion in his den: he lieth in wait to catch the poor: he doth catch the poor, when he draweth him into his net.

10He croucheth, and humbleth himself, that the poor may fall by his strong ones.

11He hath said in his heart, God hath forgotten: he hideth his face; he will never see it.

12Arise, O LORD; O God, lift up thine hand: forget not the humble.

13Wherefore doth the wicked contemn God? he hath said in his heart, Thou wilt not require it.

14Thou hast seen it; for thou beholdest mischief and spite, to requite it with thy hand: the poor committeth himself unto thee; thou art the helper of the fatherless.

15Break thou the arm of the wicked and the evil man: seek out his wickedness till thou find none.

16The LORD is King for ever and ever: the heathen are perished out of his land.

17LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble: thou wilt prepare their heart, thou wilt cause thine ear to hear:

18To judge the fatherless and the oppressed, that the man of the earth may no more oppress.

Jesus said, ‘I did not come to judge the world. I came to save the world’. (John 12:47) (Judge here means say who is wrong.)

The stories of Psalms 9 and 10

David probably wrote Psalms 9 and 10 as one psalm. The Jews thought that he wrote it after he killed Goliath. The first part says that God beat the foreign enemy (Psalm 9). The second part says that wicked men in Israel are making the helpless into oppressed people. (Psalm 10)

The reasons for thinking that it was one psalm are:

·    Psalm 10 has no words at the top about David or music. This is not usual in a psalm by David.

·    Hebrew words that David did not often use are in Psalms 9 and 10.

·    Psalms 9 and 10 make one acrostic.

Acrostic psalms use the Hebrew alphabet. The first bit starts with the first letter. The second bit starts with the second letter. This happens until the alphabet finishes. Look at Psalm 9 below. Then you will understand. We have used English letters. These are not the same as Hebrew ones. After a time some of the letters became lost or mixed up! Also, the Jews decided to make them into 2 psalms. Some Christians have put them back together as one psalm, for example, some Roman Catholics.

It is difficult to write an acrostic psalm. The words sometimes go in a strange order. This makes them hard to understand. It may give you help if you change the order of the words. In verse 3 you could say “My enemies went back” instead of “Back my enemies went”. It means the same.

Psalm 9

       The leader (must use the music) ‘Death to the son’.
(This is) a song of David

v1     All my heart sings ‘thank you’ to the LORD.
I will tell (people) of all your wonderful work.

v2     I will be very happy with you, (LORD). I will rejoice in you.
I will sing praises to your name, Most High God.

v3     Back my enemies went,
they fell down. They died in front of you,

v4       because you judged that what I did was right .
You sat on your throne. You made a righteous judgment.

v5     Clearly you judged the nations and destroyed the wicked.
People will never remember their names.

v6      You caught the enemy. You killed them.
You knocked down their cities. People will just forget them.

v7     Evermore the LORD will rule.
He has built his throne. On it he will make his judgments.

v8      He will make righteous judgments for the world.
His government will give justice to the people.

v9      For the LORD is a place where the oppressed can hide.
He will be a fortress in times of trouble.

v10    Everyone that knows your name (LORD) will put their trust in you.
LORD, you will never turn away from anyone that looks for you.

v11    Go to the LORD with praises. His throne is in Zion.
Tell all the nations all that he has done.

v12    (God) will remember the people that somebody murdered.
He will not forget the oppressed people that cry to him.

v13    Have mercy on me, LORD.
See how my enemies make my life very difficult.
Make me safe from the gates of death.

v14    Then I will tell your praises in the gates of Jerusalem.
I will rejoice that I am safe with you.

v15    Into the hole that they dug the nations fell.
They caught their own feet in the net that they hid.

v16    You will recognise the LORD by his justice.
The enemies of God will catch themselves in their own nets.
HIGGAION   SELAH

v17    Just as the enemies of God go to Sheol,
so will all the nations that forget him.

v18    Know this: God will not always forget the poor.
The oppressed will not have to hope for evermore.

v19    LORD, stand up! Do not let men become too powerful.
Let the nations find justice before you.

v20    LORD, make them afraid.
Make the nations know that they are only human.
SELAH

Word list

evermore ~ another word for always

oppressed ~ helpless people that wicked people hurt

HIGGAION ~ a place for happy music

fatherless ~ someone that has no father, usually a child

Other Acrostic Psalms

The psalms are Hebrew poetry. Poetry is when people write the words in a special way. They sound very beautiful. The Jews had a lot of rules for writing poetry. One was to make the ends of the words sound like each other. We call this “rhyming”. Another rule was to make the ideas sound like each other. Look at Psalm 9: 8. The 2 parts of the verse mean the same. This often gives us help to understand and to translate a psalm.

Another way the Jews wrote poetry was to use an acrostic. This often made the words come in the wrong order, like Psalm 9: 3. Not many of the psalms are acrostics. The most famous one is Psalm 119. The others are 25, 34, 37, 111, 112, and 145. We do not usually translate them into English as acrostics, because there are 26 letters in the English alphabet. There are only 22 in the Hebrew alphabet. We have done it with psalms 9 and 10 because some of the letters are missing. This makes it easier for us!

Psalm 10

v1      LORD, why are you standing so far away?
Why do you hide when there is trouble?

v2      In his pride the wicked man tries to catch helpless people.
I hope that wicked people catch themselves with their bad plans!

v3      The wicked boasts about what he wants.
He says good things about those that want more than is fair.
He says very bad things about the LORD.

v4      In his pride, the wicked does not look for God.
He will not even think of God.

v5      Everything that the wicked does always works well.
He puts the rules of God far from him.
He laughs at the people that do not like him.

v6      He says to himself, “There will be no trouble for me.
Nothing bad will ever happen to me or to my children”.

v7      His mouth makes bad promises.
It is full of words that are not true.
He says that he will do very bad things to people.
There is evil on his tongue.

v8      He hides behind the bushes near the villages.
He watches in secret for people to hurt.
He jumps out and murders people that have done nothing wrong.

v9      He lies like a lion under the cover of a bush.
He waits to catch someone that is helpless.
He does catch him and takes him away in his net.

v10    He beats the helpless man.
The helpless man fails and falls under the stronger man.

v11    He says to himself, “God forgot.
He hid his face. He never saw what happened”.

v12    Rise up, O God! Lift up your hand.
Do not forget the helpless people.

v13    Why does the wicked man say such bad things about God?
Why does he think, ‘God will not do anything about it’?

v14    See it all, God, all the trouble,
all the oppressed people.
Decide what to do about it.
The helpless puts his trust in you.
You give help to the fatherless.

v15    The arm of the wicked and evil man . . . break it (LORD)!
Tell him to explain what he has done.
He thought that you would not discover it!

v16    The LORD will always be king.
The nations will not remain in his land for evermore.

v17    You hear, LORD, what oppressed people want.
You listen when they pray. You give them something to hope for.

v18    You care for the fatherless and the oppressed.
People from the earth will not frighten the poor again.

What Psalm 9 Means

Not all the letters of the acrostic are here! D is not here. Perhaps somebody changed some words into other words that meant the same.

If you find the acrostic difficult, here is some help.

·    Psalm 9:3 – my enemies went back

·    Psalm 9:5 – you judged the nations clearly

·    Psalm 9:7 – the LORD will rule evermore (or always)

·    Psalm 9:15 – the nations fell into the hole that they dug

Psalm 9: 1 – 6: David is very happy. He says, “thank you” to the LORD. Why? Because David beat his enemies. David knew that God gave him help. It was God that really beat the enemies, not David on his own! God judged that David was right and the enemies wrong. The enemies were probably the Philistines. Goliath was a Philistine.

Psalm 9: 7 – 10: God is always ruling the world. Sometimes it is hard to believe this, but it is true. Sometimes we must wait a long time for his righteous judgments. Righteous here means this: the judgments of God are the best judgments. While we wait for his judgments, what can we do? Psalm 9:9-10 tells us! We can:

·    look for the LORD: if we do this, the LORD will find us!

·    trust in the LORD: if we do this the LORD will give us help

·    hide in the LORD: if we do this, the LORD will make us safe

Psalm 9: 11 – 14: When God finds us, gives us help and makes us safe, that is not the end. We must:

·    always give praises to the LORD: on our own, and in Church

·    tell people about God: our family, our friends, those we work with

Many people will not like this! As they made life difficult for David, so they will for us. So we must pray, ‘Have mercy on me, LORD’. These are the words that some Churches still pray in Greek: KYRIE ELEISON. God’s mercy is when he is loving and kind to us, and not angry.

Psalm 9: 15 – 20: In Psalm 9:6 we read, ‘You killed them’. In Psalm 9:15-16 we read how God does this. Often, people kill themselves, or each other! The plan that they made to kill their enemies kills them. They go to Sheol. The Jews thought that Sheol was a dark place. It was under the ground. The psalm finishes by telling us 2 things:

·    God will remember the oppressed, even if they have to wait a long time

·    God will teach men and women that they are only human. It is only God that is really powerful

Something to do

When there is trouble in your country, pray to God about it. Your country may fight another country. Pray to God about it. Pray for your government and your soldiers. Some of them may be Christians. Pray for justice. It may not matter which country wins. What matters is that God still rules the world. When you pray, talk to God in your own words.

What Psalm 10 means

You can see that the acrostic is incomplete. “Incomplete” means that it is not all there. The psalm is all there, though. A few words became changed. They still mean the same thing.

Psalm 10: 1 – 7: In Psalm 9 we read about the enemy of God. He was also the enemy of David. The enemy was probably a foreign country. In Psalm 10 we read about the wicked man, or the wicked. They were people that lived in David’s country. Perhaps some of them were women. They wanted more that it was fair for them to have. They made plans to take things from people that were helpless. Some of these helpless people were people of God. Sometimes they felt that God did not care any more.

Psalm 10: 8 – 11: The wicked man is like a wild animal called a lion. They kill for what they can get. In Psalm 10:11 we do not know if “he” is the bad man or the helpless man. The Hebrew Bible just says “he” . Both people felt that God was not looking.

Psalm 10: 12 – 18: David prays that God will do something. In verses 16-18 David tells his people that God will do something. God will frighten the wicked away. (Frighten means make afraid). David knew that after fighting foreign countries (look in Psalm 9) there was unrest in his own kingdom. (“Unrest” means people in the same country fighting each other). King David tried to stop it, but he knew that only God would really stop it. (A kingdom is a country that has a king or a queen.)

Something to do

When there is trouble pray to God about it. There may be unrest in your own country. Pray to God about it. You may feel frightened. You may not feel safe. Pray to God about it. Then read Psalm 10:16-18. Believe that one day it will be true. That is the promise of God to you.

Psalms 9

TO THE CHIEF MUSICIAN, UPON MUTH-LABEN. A PSALM OF DAVID or TO HE WHO GRANTS VICTORY, IMMORTALITY FOR THE SON, A PSALM OF DAVID.


<>: in Hebrew “al -mut laben”. We have translated
this phrase according to S. R. Hirsch but the translation is technically
difficult and somewhat forced.
The Psalm speaks in the name of all Israel. In the Bible the chosen king
(e.g. Solomon) is referred to by the Almighty as His “son” (2-Samuel 7:14,
cf Psalm 80:17). The people of Israel as a collective entity are also
referred to as the “son” of God, e.g. <ISRAEL IS MY
SON, EVEN MY FIRSTBORN>> [Exodus 4:22].

[Psalms 9:1] I WILL PRAISE THEE, O LORD,  WITH MY WHOLE HEART;  I WILL SHEW
FORTH ALL THY  MARVELLOUS WORKS.

<>:  In Hebrew “Odeh” meaning acknowledge.

[Psalms 9:2] I WILL BE GLAD AND REJOICE IN THEE:  I WILL SING PRAISE TO THY
NAME, O THOU MOST HIGH.

[Psalms 9:3] WHEN MINE ENEMIES ARE TURNED BACK, THEY SHALL FALL  AND PERISH
AT THY  PRESENCE.

[Psalms 9:4] FOR THOU HAST MAINTAINED MY RIGHT AND MY CAUSE; THOU SATEST IN
THE THRONE  JUDGING RIGHT.

[Psalms 9:5] THOU HAST REBUKED THE HEATHEN, THOU HAST DESTROYED THE
WICKED,  THOU HAST  PUT OUT THEIR NAME FOR EVER AND EVER.

This Psalm was written by David. It has some pertienence to the time of
David though it also is describing  what will happen after the Messiah son
of  David appears.   Some Commentators say the Psalm is seaking on behalf
of ALL ISRAEL in a collective sense.

[Psalms 9:6] O THOU ENEMY,  DESTRUCTIONS ARE COME TO A PERPETUAL END: AND
THOU HAST DESTROYED CITIES;  THEIR MEMORIAL IS PERISHED WITH THEM.

[Psalms 9:7] BUT THE LORD SHALL ENDURE FOR EVER:  HE HATH PREPARED HIS
THRONE FOR  JUDGMENT.

[Psalms 9:8] AND HE SHALL JUDGE THE WORLD IN RIGHTEOUSNESS,  HE SHALL
MINISTER JUDGMENT TO THE PEOPLE IN UPRIGHTNESS.

[Psalms 9:9] THE LORD ALSO WILL BE A REFUGE FOR THE OPPRESSED,  A REFUGE IN
TIMES OF  TROUBLE.

When you are in trouble and you pray to the Almighty He will help you.
Sometimes it is difficulty to pray for psychological reasons. In such cases
even reading the Bible or efficacious works can help the point is to
somehow direct oneself towards the Almighty.

[Psalms 9:10] AND THEY THAT KNOW THY NAME WILL PUT THEIR TRUST IN THEE: FOR
THOU, LORD, HAST NOT FORSAKEN THEM THAT SEEK THEE.

If you search you will find and be helped and be of help to others.

[Psalms 9:11] SING PRAISES TO THE LORD,  WHICH DWELLETH IN ZION:  DECLARE
AMONG THE  PEOPLE HIS DOINGS.

      <DWELLETH IN ZION>>: God makes His presence apparent though
Jerusalem and Israel.    The God of Israel is the Almighty Himself. There
is no other. Only through the God of Israel can salvation be found. All the
nations MUST acknowledge the God of Israel. Israel MUST be made aware of
their own Israelite ancestral sources. We have an obligation beyond
ourselves and our own survival and that of our family.

[Psalms 9:12] WHEN HE MAKETH INQUISITION FOR BLOOD,  HE REMEMBERETH THEM:
HE FORGETTETH  NOT THE CRY OF THE HUMBLE.

[Psalms 9:13] HAVE MERCY UPON ME, O LORD; CONSIDER MY TROUBLE WHICH I
SUFFER OF  THEM THAT HATE ME,  THOU THAT LIFTEST ME UP FROM THE GATES OF
DEATH:

<>: in Hebrew “Chanani” which (S.R. Hirsch) can mean,
“give me the means”. Help me overcome if necessary by way of nature but
through your enabling me to realise my own potential.   The people of
Israel are capable of solving their own problems and also those of the
entire world but first they must turn their hearts back to the
Almighty.  They must be made aware of where they came from and the
corresponding duties laid upon them.
David was persecuted and in danger of his life several times.  So
too,  the future Messiah may initially suffer such tribulations. Also
Israel as  an historic entity has been indanger saeveral times and still
is. The Jews (Judah) have also survuived numerous and continuous attempts
to eliminate them by every means possible.  The enemy of Judah is the enemy
of  Israel and the enemy of Israel is the enemy of  Judah.  The enemy of
Judah and Israel is the enemy of the Almighty.

[Psalms 9:14] THAT I MAY SHEW FORTH ALL THY PRAISE IN THE GATES OF THE
DAUGHTER OF ZION:  I  WILL REJOICE IN THY SALVATION.

[Psalms 9:15] THE HEATHEN ARE SUNK DOWN IN THE PIT THAT THEY MADE: IN THE
NET WHICH THEY  HID IS THEIR OWN FOOT TAKEN.
Our enemies will fall in their own traps.

[Psalms 9:16] THE LORD IS KNOWN BY THE JUDGMENT WHICH HE EXECUTETH: THE
WICKED IS   SNARED IN THE WORK OF HIS OWN HANDS. HIGGAION.  SELAH.

<>: From the Hebrew “hegeh” meaning thought, contemplation.  The
English word “though” (Old English, “thoht”) is derived from the same
Hebrew root.
S.R. Hirsch explains “Higaion” to mean: “the truth that becomes
apparent”;  “the truth that reveals the hand of God in history”

[Psalms 9:17] THE WICKED SHALL BE TURNED INTO HELL, AND ALL THE NATIONS
THAT FORGET GOD.

<>:  In Hebrew “Sheolah”, i.e. to the grave,  to down below, to
destruction. “Sheolah” is from “Sheol” (grave, underworld) and perhaps
connected to the root “She-al”  to borrow. This coukld indicate either a
state of limbo or of eternal perdition.  The natural destiny of man
is  eternal life but through sin this can be forfeited.

[Psalms 9:18] FOR THE NEEDY SHALL NOT ALWAY BE FORGOTTEN:  THE EXPECTATION
OF THE POOR  SHALL NOT PERISH FOR EVER.

Everything has a purpose and reason. God hears you and looks after you. He
wants you to be with Him in both this world and the next.

[Psalms 9:19] ARISE, O LORD; LET NOT MAN PREVAIL: LET THE HEATHEN BE JUDGED IN THY SIGHT.

[Psalms 9:20] PUT THEM IN FEAR, O LORD: THAT THE NATIONS MAY KNOW
THEMSELVES TO BE  BUT MEN.  SELAH.

Psalms Index
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Psalms:

A collection of 150 psalms, whose Hebrew name is “The Book of Praise.” Authors of individual psalms include David, Solomon, Moses, Asaph, and others who are anonymous. The variety and unity of Psalms have given this book a unique place in the devotional life of the individual and the Church. Almost every aspect of man’s relation to God is depicted in these poems, simple trust, the sense of sin, appeal to a higher power in time of trouble, and the conviction that the world is in the hands of a loving God.